ICIAM 2023 News

May 11, 2022 : Invited Lectures

The organizers of ICIAM 2023 are pleased to inform about the invited lectures at ICIAM 2023. Please see here.

April 20, 2022 : The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture

The organizers of ICIAM 2023 are pleased to inform about the Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture at ICIAM 2023. Please see here.

April 15, 2022 : Submissions for Contributed Talks Open

The organizers of ICIAM 2023 are pleased to inform the submissions for the contributed talks are open. If you are interested in submitting a contributed talk, please see here.

April 1, 2022 : Submissions for Minisymposium Open

The organizers of ICIAM 2023 are pleased to inform the submissions for the minisymposium are open. If you are interested in proposing a minisymposium, please see here.

March 1, 2022 : Call for Minisymposia and Contributed Talks

The organizers of ICIAM 2023 are pleased to inform the calls for minisymposia and contributed talks. If you are interested in proposing a minisymposium or/and participating in a contributed talk, please see here.

August 20, 2021 : E-mail Notifications for ICIAM 2023 News

If you are interested in receiving e-mail notifications for ICIAM 2023 News, please see here.

Previous News

Conference Format

In principle, ICIAM 2023 will be held in a hybrid conference format. If the situation demands, we will switch the conference format to an online format. Even if that is the case, ICIAM 2023 will not reimburse any expense including travel expenses and hotel charges of participants.

Congress Venue

Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

Waseda University is the largest research university in Japan. It is also one of the oldest universities, founded in 1882 by Shigenobu Okuma, who later became Prime Minister of Japan. The Okuma Auditorium was built in 1927 after his death in commemoration of his achievements. This auditorium is the symbol of Waseda University now. We plan to use 14 university buildings for ICIAM 2023. The buildings of Waseda University’s main campus are located close together, providing easy access from one building to another. A significant amount of signage and student volunteers will be used to assist the participants at the ICIAM venue.


The combination of these rooms and halls will enable us to hold at least 70 parallel sessions during the Congress, and all the facilities are designed to be barrier-free for guests with disabilities. Lunch is to be taken at restaurants around the congress venue, or at the cafeterias of Waseda Campus. Cafeterias will be able to cater to those with dietary restrictions and/or special needs.

Another attractive point of the venue is its convenient access from the metro system. The “Waseda” metro station is just a 5-minute walk from the Congress venue and the trains run every 5 minutes, from 5:00 am to midnight.

Accessibility is also good in Tokyo. Most of the metro and train stations are easily accessible for the disabled and most of them are equipped with either elevators or lifts. The “Waseda” metro station has both elevators and lifts. In addition, smart cards “Suica” and “Pasmo” can be used on almost all rail and bus lines in the Tokyo metropolitan area, and are accepted by a growing number of taxis. “Suica” IC cards are available for purchase at JR stations, while “Pasmo” cards are available at subway, private railway stations, and bus depots. You can also use these cards for shopping as electronic money at a constantly increasing number of registered shops.


The former president of Waseda University has kindly accepted our request for using, without a fee, any buildings with various modern conference equipment at the Waseda Campus. He hopes that this offer will assist the advancement of applied mathematics and industrial mathematics.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government also has funds for supporting international congresses. The Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, where S. Oishi was the senior Dean, and the Tokyo Convention and Visitors Bureau of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government have signed a comprehensive partnership agreement. Based on this agreement, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government has already decided to provide financial support worth approximately US$300,000 for ICIAM 2023 on the condition that it be held at Waseda University with a certain number of foreign participants. Furthermore, support of complimentary cultural programs for 120 persons and half-day city tours for 800 persons will be offered.

Prize and Invited Lectures

Prize

TBA

Invited Lectures

Prof. Cynthia Dwork

TBA

Prof. Youssef Marzouk

TBA

Prof. Tamara Kolda

Tamara G. Kolda is an independent mathematical consultant under the auspices of her company MathSci.ai based in California. She is also a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Department of Industrial Engineering & Management Science at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. From 1999-2021, she was a researcher at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. She specializes in mathematical algorithms and computation methods for tensor decompositions, tensor eigenvalues, graph algorithms, randomized algorithms, machine learning, network science, numerical optimization, and distributed and parallel computing. She is serves as the founding editor-in-chief for the SIAM Journal on Mathematics of Data Science (SIMODS) and as the Chair of the Illustrating the Impact of the Mathematical Sciences study for the U.S. National Academies. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), and Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Prof. Kavita Ramanan

TBA

Prof. Lior Horesh

TBA

Prof. Rachel Ward

Rachel Ward is the W.A. “Tex” Moncrief Distinguished Professor in Computational Engineering and Sciences — Data Science and Professor of Mathematics at UT Austin. She is recognized for her contributions to stochastic gradient descent, compressive sensing, and randomized linear embeddings. From 2017-2018, Dr. Ward was a visiting researcher at Facebook AI Research. Prior to joining UT Austin in 2011, Dr. Ward received the PhD in Computational and Applied Mathematics at Princeton in 2009 and was a Courant Instructor at the Courant Institute, NYU, from 2009-2011. Among her awards are the Sloan research fellowship, NSF CAREER award, 2016 IMA prize in mathematics and its applications, 2020 Simons fellowship in mathematics. She is also an invited speaker at the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians.

Prof. Andrew Stuart

TBA

Prof. Eva Tardos

TBA

Prof. Jose Antonio Carrillo de la Plata

José A. Carrillo is currently Professor of the Analysis of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations at the Mathematical Institute and Tutorial Fellow in Applied Mathematics at The Queen’s College, University of Oxford associated to the OxPDE and WCMB groups. He was previously Chair in Applied and Numerical Analysis at Imperial College London from October 2012 till March 2020 and ICREA Research Professor at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona during the period 2003-2012. He was a lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin 1998-2000; and held assistant and associate professor positions at the Universidad de Granada 1992-1998 and 2000-2003, where he also did his PhD. He works on kinetic equations and nonlinear nonlocal diffusion equations. He has contributed to the theoretical and numerical analysis of PDEs, and their simulation in different applications such as granular media, semiconductors and lately in collective behaviour. His main scholarship contributions in analysis of PDEs are in aggregation-diffusion problems, i.e. nonlinear Fokker-Planck type equations; the use of optimal transport techniques and entropy methods to analyse theoretically and numerically gradient-flow structures for PDEs and their singularities; the analysis of kinetic models for self-organization, and their implications in mathematical biology, control engineering and global optimization. He has also developed numerical schemes for nonlinear aggregation-diffusions and gradient flows preserving the free energy decay property and thus the equilibrium measures and is lately interested in extending these properties to phase transitions. His interests in mathematical biology include the understanding of cell sorting by differential adhesion and synchronization phenomena in neuroscience.

He served as chair of the Applied Mathematics Committee of the European Mathematical Society 2014-2017. He was the chair of the 2018 Year of Mathematical Biology. He was the Program Director of the SIAM activity group in Analysis of PDE 2019-2020. He is vice-president of the European Society for Mathematical and Theoretical Biology 2021-2023; and member of the Scientific Committee of the Spanish National Science Agency 2021-2024. He was elected as member of the European Academy of Sciences, Section Mathematics in 2018, SIAM Fellow Class 2019, Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and Foreign Member of the Royal Academy of Sciences of Spain since 2021. He is currently the head of the Division of the European Academy of Sciences, Section Mathematics. He was recognised with the SEMA prize (2003) and the GAMM Richard Von-Mises prize (2006) for young researchers, a Wolfson Research Merit Award by the Royal Society 2012-2017, and the 2016 SACA award for best PhD supervision at Imperial College London. He has been Highly Cited Researcher in 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 by Web of Science. He has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant 2019 to pursue his investigations in complex particle dynamics: phase transitions, patterns, and synchronization.

Prof. Gitta Kutyniok

TBA

Prof. Albert Cohen

My early research works (from my PhD of 1990, supervised by Yves Meyer, until 1998) were concerned with the development of the theory of wavelet bases in relation with algorithms used in signal and image processing, or in computer aided geometric design. One significant achievement was the derivation, together with Ingrid Daubechies and Jean-Christophe Feauveau, of biorthogonal wavelet bases which are used in the state of the art image compression standard JPEG 2000.

Since 1998, my research is oriented in various applicative directions, with as a common denominator its theoretical foundations in nonlinear approximation theory and harmonic analysis. In particular, it has led to the development and analysis of adaptive and sparsity-based numerical methods in various application contexts such as (i) data compression, (ii) statistical estimation and learning theory or (iii) discretizations of partial differential equations.

I am often joining forces with my colleagues Wolfgang Dahmen and Ronald DeVore. Some of our most significant results are concerned with the analysis of adaptive methods for PDE’s, the space BV, greedy algorithms, and statistical learning theory. A topic of particular interest the present time is high-dimensional approximation problems arising in learning theory and in the numerical treatment of parametric and stochastic PDE’s.

My current research is in particular concerned with problems that involve a very large number of variables, and whose efficient numerical treatment is therefore challenged by the so-called curse of dimensionality, meaning that computational complexity increases exponentially in the variable dimension. Such problems are ubiquitous in an increasing number of applicative areas, among which statistical or active learning theory, parametric and stochastic partial differential equations, parameter optimization in numerical codes, with a high demand from the industrial world of efficient numerical methods. Central scientific objectives in this context are (i) to identify fundamental mathematical principles behind overcoming the curse of dimensionality, (ii) to understand how these principles enter in relevant instances of the applications described above, and, (iii) based on these principles to develop broadly applicable concrete adaptive numerical strategies that benefit from such mechanisms.

This research has been supported by the Advanced ERC grant BREAD (Breaking the Curse of Dimensionality in Analysis and Simulation) awarded in 2014.

Prof. Martin Burger

Martin Burger is a Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Department of Mathematics, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. His interests include nonlinear partial differential equations, inverse problems, and variational techniques in imaging. In particular, he is known for the development and mathematical analysis of nonlinear regularization methods for inverse and imaging methods. His further interests include the development of mathematical models in life and social sciences, which together drive interdisciplinary research developments, e.g., in biomedical imaging. Martin Burger has received several awards and honors for his scientific contributions, such as the Calderon prize for distinguished contributions in the field of inverse problems.

He serves on editorial boards of several journals and is one of the editors-in-chief of the European Journal of Applied Mathematics.

Prof. Francis Bach

TBA

Prof. Monique Laurent

TBA

Prof. Endre Süli

The work of Endre Süli is concerned with the analysis of numerical algorithms for the approximate solution of partial differential equations and the mathematical analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in continuum mechanics.

Born in Yugoslavia in 1956, he was educated at the University of Belgrade and did his graduate work as a British Council Scholar at the University of Reading and at St Catherine’s College, Oxford. He received his doctorate in mathematics from the University of Belgrade in 1985, and in the same year he was appointed to a faculty position at the University of Oxford, where he is a Professor of Numerical Analysis and a Fellow of Worcester College.

He was elected a Foreign Member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (2009), a Member of the European Academy of Sciences (2010), a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (2016), a Member of the Academia Europaea (2020), and a Fellow of the Royal Society (2021).

His other honours include: Chair, Society for the Foundations of Computational Mathematics (SFoCM, 2002–2005), Invited Speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM 2006, Madrid), Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (FIMA, 2007), Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture, Aachen (2011), IMA Service Award (2011), Professor Hospitus Universitatis Carolinae Pragensis, Charles University in Prague (2012–), Distinguished Visiting Chair Professor, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2013), President, SIAM United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland Section (2013–2015), London Mathematical Society/New Zealand Mathematical Society Forder Lecturer (2015), Aziz Lecture, University of Maryland (2015), BIMOS Distinguished Lecture, Berlin (2016), John von Neumann Lecture, Münster (2016), Sibe Mardešić Lecture, Zagreb (2018), and London Mathematical Society Naylor Prize and Lectureship (2021).

Prof. Michele Benzi

Michele Benzi was born and raised in Bologna, Italy, where he attended the local university, graduating in Mathematics with honors in 1987. He received a PhD degree in Applied Mathematics in 1993 from North Carolina State University. After holding positions at the University of Bologna, at CERFACS in Toulouse (France) and at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in 2000 he joined the faculty of Emory University in Atlanta. He was promoted to full professor in 2006, and in 2012 he was named the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science. In 2018 he returned to Italy as Professor of Numerical Analysis at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa. He is the author or co-author of over 130 publications and has supervised 15 PhD students and post-docs. Michele Benzi serves, or has served, on the editorial board of 20 scientific journals, and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications. He is the recipient of several awards, including the SIAM Outstanding Paper Prize (2001, joint with M. Tuma). His research has been supported by the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, and the Italian Ministry of University and Research.

Michele Benzi is a SIAM Fellow (2012), a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society (2018), and a member of Academia Europaea (2019).

Prof. Antonin Chambolle

Antonin Chambolle is currently a CNRS senior research scientist working at CEREMADE, the applied mathematics department of Université Paris-Dauphine in Paris, France. Prior, he held a similar position in applied mathematics at CMAP, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, with also a teaching position. His interests is in mathematical methods for the studies of discontinuities, singularities and geometric variational problems, for applications ranging from image reconstruction, data analysis, to elasticity problems with fractures and materials science. His work addresses theoretical issues, such as the existence of a crystalline mean curvature flow or of minimizers of linearized elasticity energies with fracture terms, numerical issues such as the discretization of singular functionals (total variation, Mumford-Shah) and algorithmic and computational issues. He is the co-authors of several works in mathematical programming developing efficient algorithms for non-smooth convex optimization and was awarded the “Michel Monpetit-INRIA” prize by the French Academy of Science in 2021.

He studied at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and then obtained a PhD from Université Paris-Dauphine in 1993, under the supervision of Prof. Jean-Michel Morel. He also spent some time in SISSA, Trieste, Italy, in the group of Prof. Gianni Dal Maso. Later, he was “French Government Fellow” at Churchill College, Cambridge (UK) in 2015-16, working with the Cambridge Image Analysis at DAMTP.

Prof. Xiaoyun Wang

Xiaoyun Wang is a mathematician and cryptographer. She is a C. N. Yang Professor in Institute for Advanced Study, Tsinghua University, the Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences and the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) fellow. Xiaoyun Wang is well-known for her research on hash functions. Hash functions are the key technique of many cryptographic applications such as digital signatures, integrity verifications, password validations and blockchains. A hash function generates a short digest (digital fingerprint) of the input message. Collision-resistance is one of three security properties of cryptographic hash functions (the others are preimage resistance and second-preimage resistance). Xiaoyun Wang developed the bit-based cryptanalysis theory, and gave the collision attack on five dedicated hash functions including widely deployed MD5 and SHA-1. In response to SHA-1 attack, the US National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) recommended the replacement of SHA-1 by SHA-2 hash function family and announced a 5-year project to design the new hash function standard SHA-3. She was in charge of designing SM3 cryptographic hash function, as the Chinese standard, which has been deployed widely in financial, transportation, state grid and other important economic fields in China. In October 2018, SM3 officially became one of the ISO/IEC standards of new generation hash functions. She also analysed some cryptographic primitives with keys, including message authentication codes, symmetric ciphers and authenticated encryption schemes, and achieved very important results on HMAC-MD5, MD5-MAC, SIMON, Keccak-MAC, etc. Since 2006, she has been focusing on post-quantum public-key cryptography, and gave innovative results in lattice-based cryptography, including a two-level heuristic sieve algorithm for general lattices and the design of practical lattice-based algorithms with tight security.

Prof. Lei Guo

Lei GUO received his B.S. degree in mathematics from Shandong University in 1982 and a Ph.D. degree in control theory from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in 1987. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Australian National University from 1987 to1989 and became a Professor of the Institute of Systems Science at CAS in 1992. From 2002 to 2012, he was the President of the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science at CAS. He has been the Director of the National Center for Mathematics and Interdisciplinary Sciences at CAS since 2010.

Dr. Guo is a Fellow of IEEE, Member of CAS, Fellow of the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS), Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC). He received the 1993 IFAC World Congress Young Author Prize, the IFAC Outstanding Service Award, and an honorary doctorate from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. He delivered plenary lectures at the triennial IFAC World Congress twice, in 1999 and 2014, and an invited lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) in 2002. In 2019, he was awarded the Hendrik W. Bode Lecture Prize by the IEEE Control Systems Society “for fundamental and practical contributions to the field of adaptive control, system identification, adaptive signal processing, stochastic systems, and applied mathematics” in France, where he delivered the Bode Prize Lecture at the 58th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control.

He formerly served as Council Member of IFAC (2005-2011), General Co-Chair of the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC’2009), Congress Director of the 8th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM’2015), and President of the China Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (CSIAM, 2008-2016). He has also served as a member of editorial boards of several professional journals including SIAM J. Control and Optimization.

His research interests include stochastic systems, adaptive control, system identification, adaptive filtering, machine learning, control of nonlinear and uncertain dynamical systems, maximum feedback capability, multi-agent systems, and game-based control systems.

Prof. Ichiro Hagiwara

Ichiro HAGIWARA Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Dr. Eng. ASME Fellow, Research and Intellectual Property Strategic Organization, Meiji Institute for Advanced Study of Mathematical Sciences(MIMS),
Meiji University’s Institute of Autonomous Driving(MIAD), Emeritus Professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Member of Science Council of Japan(SCJ).

He received his BS and MS Degrees in applied mathematical engineering from Kyoto University in 1970 and 1972. Also he received his PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1990. He worked as a researcher at the research center of Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. from April of 1972 to March of 1996. He worked as a professor Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology(TIT)from April 1st in 1996 to 31st of March in 2012. And since april 1st, he has worked in Meiji University, Second Director, Institute for Advanced Study of Mathematical Sciences(MIMS), Professor, Organization for the Strategic Coordination of Research and Intellectual Property (Emeritus Professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology). He is now engaged in MIMS and MIAD(Meiji university’s Institute of Autonomous Driving) as a Meiji University distinguished professor emeritus. He is an honorary member of JSIAM(Japan Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics), JSME(Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers),JSST(Japan Society for Simulation Technology) and JACM(Japan Association for Computational Mechanics). He is a fellow member of ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), JSAE(Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan) and ASIAIM(Asia Simulation Association). He served as a consulting professor at Harbin Institute of Technology, P.R.Ckina. He also served as a guest professor & a consulting professor of The State Key Laboratory of Vibration, shock & Noise of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P.R.China. And he served as a Foreign communication member of the academic committee of the state key laboratory of automotive safety and energy of Tsinghua University, P.R.China, an honorary professor of School of Mechanical Engineering on Jianjin University, P.R.China and an additional professor of Huazhong University of Science and Technology and an additional professor of Nanjing university of information & technology, P.R.China. He is also a member of Science Council of Japan(SCJ) since March of 2006. He received numerous awards from several academic societies at home and abroad for his various types of researches for computational mechanics, sound and vibration, machine learning, control and origami engineering. He also received Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Award for his computational mechanics aided origami engineering. He is now interested in both of origami engineering and intelligent self-driving car.

His title for the invited lecture in ICIAM 2023 is “Mathematical sciences for realization of origami engineering aided land / sea / air self-driving car with intelligence”. The lecture will consist of origami engineering, machine learning, optimal control and control of plural eigenfrequencies. In origami engineering, it will be shown the most splendid Japanese Kirigami honeycomb which receives very much attention because it is the best treasure trove to produce metamaterials. As far as machine learning, it will be shown his own technology FQHNN(Fuzzy Quantification method aided Holographic Neural Network) which has causal information unlike CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) which leads the third generation of machine learning. And in optimal control, it will be shown also his own method which is only one real-time optimal control method. The so-called optimal control is not used in the real car because Pontryagin’s maximum principle gives the nonlinear equation which cannot be solved in real time. He has noticed the analogy of the new optimal control theory and the nature of the solution of parabolic equations for the first time and this has contributed to pass this problem. As far as control of plural eigenfrequencies, it is very difficult to be applied the conventional topology optimization. He has developed a new high speed and high accuracy topology change method for ride quality improvement and elimination of anxiety due to the absence of the driver in the self-driving car from observations of strain and dynamic energy distributions of each eigen frequency mode. He is mobilizing with his lab members all of these technologies to successfully create an origami engineering aided land / sea / air self-driving car with intelligence. Here he will discuss the mathematical backbones for these techniques which successfully develop the dream land / sea / air self-driving car with intelligence.

Prof. Yasuaki Hiraoka

TBA

Prof. Satoru Iwata

TBA

Prof. Gary Froyland

Gary Froyland is a professor of mathematics at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Prof. Alicia Dickenstein

Alicia Dickenstein is a Professor at the University of Buenos Aires and a Senior Researcher at CONICET, the National Research Council of Argentina. She is a Member of the National Academy of Exact and Natural Sciences and of the National Academy of Sciences of Argentina. She was Vice-President of the International Mathematical Union. She is an AMS Fellow and a SIAM Fellow. She holds Honorary Doctorates from UNS, Argentina, and KTH, Sweden. She received the 2015 TWAS Prize in Mathematics and a 2021 L’Oréal-UNESCO Award “For Women in Science”.

The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture

The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture at ICIAM 2023

The International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics has selected Professor IIse C.F. Ipsen of North Carolina State University, USA, to deliver the Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture at the International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, ICIAM 2023, in Tokyo, Japan. This Congress is the most important international event in applied and industrial mathematics, held once every four years under the auspices of the International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

Ilse Ipsen is an applied mathematician whose pioneering work, from the outset, has been aimed at advancing the foundations and applications of numerical linear algebra. Her publications and presentations are distinguished by crystal clear exposition and exceptional attention to detail.

Ilse Ipsen’s early work was at the forefont of designing matrix algorithms for implementation on VLSI special purpose architectures as well as general purpose parallel machines. She has worked on inverse iteration for computing eigenvectors; solution of nonsymmetric linear systems via Krylov methods; perturbation theory for linear systems; and eigenvalue and singular value problems with application to nonlinear problems. She established the class of multiplicative perturbations which have become instrumental in the analysis of high accuracy matrix computations; and established an algorithmic classification that lead to the development of high accuracy rank revealing QR algorithms.

Ilse Ipsen is well known for her work on the Google PageRank algorithm, often described as “the world’s largest matrix problem”. In collaboration with physicists, she tackled the notoriously difficult numerical computation of characteristic polynomials, which are required in nuclear lattice simulations and the study of fermions.

More recently, she has been instrumental in introducing probability theory and statistics into numerical linear algebra for: the design and analysis of fast randomized least squares/regression algorithms in the context of large-scale data science problems; statistical roundoff error analysis for realistic bounds in the context of emerging mixed and low precision processors; and probabilistic numeric linear solvers that generate probability distributions for propagating numerical errors through computational pipelines.

Professor Ipsen received a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; and a Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University, USA, both in Computer Science. After 10 years on the Computer Science faculty at Yale University, she is now a Professor of Mathematics at North Carolina State University, USA.

Awards and honors

Professor Ipsen is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture

The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture is one of the invited lectures at the International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics. This honour is conferred on a “woman who has made outstanding contributions in applied mathematics and/or scientific computation”. The lecture is named in tribute to the memory of Olga Taussky-Todd, whose scientific legacy is in both theoretical and applied mathematics, and whose work exemplifies the qualities to be recognized. The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture series was inaugurated in 2007 with a lecture by Pauline van den Driessche at ICIAM 2007 in Zurich. The lecturers since then have been Beatrice Pelloni (Vancouver, 2011), Éva Tardos (Beijing, 2015), Françoise Tisseur (Valencia, 2019), and Ilse Ipsen (Tokyo, 2023).

The Olga Taussky-Todd Lecture for ICIAM 2023

Lecturers are selected by a committee established by the ICIAM President, with advice from the Association for Women in Mathematics and European Women in Mathematics.  Nominations are solicited from the mathematical sciences community. The Committee for the 2023 Lecture consisted of

  • Lisa Fauci, Chair (Tulane University)
  • Mirjam Dür (University of Augsburg)
  • Isabelle Gallagher (Ecole Normale Supérieure)
  • Suzanne Weekes (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)
  • Mary Wheeler (University of Texas at Austin)
  • Guiying Yan (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

Calls for Minisymposia, Contributed Talks and Others

Call for Minisymposia

What is a Minisymposium

A minisymposium is composed of one or a few sessions (up to three sessions) of coordinated presentations on a single topic of interest and importance in industrial and applied mathematics. Each session within a minisymposium should include four presentations in two hours. Each speaker should be allotted 25 minutes for their presentation, with an additional 5 minutes for discussion.

An “industrial minisymposium” is a form of a minisymposium whose main objective is to visualize the current situation/state of industrial mathematics transfer around the world through the presentation of successful real-world collaborations with industry. The structure of an industrial minisymposium is the same as that of a standard minisymposium. For details, see the section “Industrial Minisymposia”.

Prospective minisymposium organizers are asked to submit a proposal consisting of a title, a description (not to exceed 100 words), and a list of speakers and titles of their presentations, using the online submission form at the ICIAM 2023 webpage: https://iciam2023.org

The Local Scientific Program Committee will referee all minisymposium proposals. Upon acceptance of the proposal, each minisymposium speaker will be asked to submit a 75-word abstract.

To ensure balance, ICIAM 2023 prefers that a single individual not be the organizer of more than one minisymposium. In addition, ICIAM 2023 discourages minisymposia in which most of the speakers come from the same organization or if all co-authors on the papers being presented in a minisymposium are from the same organization.

Important Dates

All deadlines are at midnight AoE (Anywhere on Earth).

  • Submissions open on April 1, 2022
  • Closing date for submissions of proposals: December 23, 2022
  • Acceptance notification for proposals: within one month after submission of each proposal
  • Closing date for submissions of abstracts from speakers: March 15, 2023
  • Registration fees for speakers are due on July 20, 2023 (Speakers who have not registered at that date will have their talks removed from the program.)

The schedule of minisymposia is planned to be made available from May – June, 2023.

Important Notices

  1. Limitation of the number of talks by each participant: Each participant is limited to presenting at most one talk during the congress (ICIAM 2023), including talks in contributed talks, this is in order to provide the opportunity for everyone to present their research. Note that talks in industrial minisymposia and industrial contributed talks as well as invited talks are excluded from this limitation. If you are invited to speak in more than one minisymposium, we suggest you use the opportunity to nominate a colleague or student to speak about your work.
  2. Conference format: In principle, ICIAM 2023 will be held in a hybrid conference format, i.e., a session in a minisymposium may mix on-site and online talks. If the situation demands, we will switch the conference format to an online format. Even if that is the case, ICIAM 2023 will not reimburse any expenses including travel expenses and hotel charges of participants.
  3. Registration fee refunds: See “Cancellation and Refund Policy”.
  4. No exemption from payment of registration fee: ICIAM 2023 will not be able to waive the registration fee for minisymposium organizers and speakers, or reimburse their expenses. Therefore, minisymposium organizers should make no financial commitments on behalf of ICIAM 2023 when organizing their minisymposium.

Organizing a Minisymposium

Those interested in organizing a minisymposium should submit a proposal to the Local Scientific Program Committee by no later than the due date. Organizers will select the topics to be addressed, obtain speakers for those topics, decide with each speaker on the title of his/her presentation, and provide other information as needed. Organizers are especially encouraged to include speakers from more than one country and from underrepresented groups, including women and minorities, whenever appropriate.

A minisymposium may have up to four organizers, who can also be speakers, and chair the sessions. In conducting the minisymposium, one of the session organizers should provide an overview of the minisymposium, introduce the speakers, and provide an opportunity for discussion among the speakers and the audience.

Prospective minisymposium organizers should seriously consider the following recommendations when selecting speakers in a minisymposium:

  • Speakers should be selected primarily for their current contributions to the topic area.
  • Speakers should be as representative of researchers in the area as is practical.
  • Minisymposium organizers should select the first speaker who can provide an overview of the topic area, put the whole area in perspective, particularly regarding applications, and suggest new venues for sustainable research and applications. It is recommended that one of the minisymposium organizers becomes the first speaker.

Guidelines for Preparing a Minisymposium Proposal

Only one of the minisymposium organizers will be the contact person with the organization. The contact person should fill out the online submission form and provide the following information:

Contact person: Provide full name, title, affiliation, address, and e-mail address. All correspondence regarding the minisymposium will be sent to the e-mail address of the contact person.

A minisymposium can have up to four organizers. When filling out the online submission form, please assign a contact person.

Title of the minisymposium: Describe the subject of your minisymposium as accurately and specifically as possible in no more than ten words.

Abstract: Describe your minisymposium in no more than 100 words. The summary should be written to attract those who specifically work on your topic as well as those who work in related areas. It is suggested that you explain the problem area to be addressed by the speakers and why it is important in significant applications; identify current directions of research and methods being developed to solve problems, including their advantages and shortcomings; and describe the scope of your minisymposium.

Speakers: Provide full name, affiliation, country, and e-mail address of each speaker and the title of their presentation.

For industrial minisymposia: Provide at most three key words. One IMA option must be selected. At most two items in the list of Economic Activities and/or Societal Challenges may be selected.

Industrial Minisymposia

As mentioned above, an industrial minisymposium is a form of a minisymposium. The term ‘industry’ is used, in a broad sense to denote all kinds of business and commercial firms with economic activity and non-profit R&D organizations with activities outside the realm of education and academic research (including financial institutions, public administrations, and hospitals). The participation of speakers from industrial fields is encouraged.

Industrial minisymposia will be structured in accordance with “Economic Activities of Industrial or Business Interest” and “Societal Challenges”. In addition, the proposals should focus on one (and only one) of the following Industrial Mathematics Aspects (IMA):

  • IMA-1. Success stories developed under memorandum of understanding, contract, or competitive projects with industrial support.
  • IMA-2. Case studies including initiatives such as study groups with industry, modelling weeks, industry days, master thesis, PhD thesis, etc.
  • IMA-3. Education.
  • IMA-4. Worldwide infrastructures to promote collaborations between industry and academia.
  • IMA-5. Other

Economic Activities of Industrial or Business Interest

  • EA-1. Agriculture and Fishing
  • EA-2. Biomedicine and Health Care
  • EA-3. Construction
  • EA-4. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Industry
  • EA-5. Economy and Finance
  • EA-6. Electronics
  • EA-7. Energy and Environment
  • EA-8. Food
  • EA-9. Information and Communication Technology
  • EA-10. Logistics and Transport
  • EA-11. Materials
  • EA-12. Mechanics and Mechatronics
  • EA-13. Public Administration and Defense
  • EA-14. Service Management
  • EA-15. Textiles, Clothing and Footwear
  • EA-16. Other

Societal Challenges

  • SC-1. Health, demographic change and well-being
  • SC-2. Food security, sustainable agriculture and forestry, marine and maritime and inland water research, and the Bioeconomy
  • SC-3. Secure, clean and efficient energy
  • SC-4. Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials
  • SC-5. A changing world ‐ inclusive, innovative and reflective societies
  • SC-6. Secure societies – protecting freedom and security
  • SC-7. Other

Call for Contributed Talks

What is a Contributed Talk

Contributed talks in lecture format are invited in all areas consistent with the congress themes covering topics in industrial and applied mathematics. A contributed talk is a 15-minute oral presentation, with additional 5 minutes for discussion. Those intending to participate in a contributed talk at ICIAM 2023 must submit the title of their presentation, together with a brief abstract (not to exceed 75 words), using the online submission form at the ICIAM 2023 webpage: https://iciam2023.org

An “industrial contributed talk” is a form of a contributed talk whose main objective is to visualize the current situation/state of industrial mathematics transfer around the world through the presentation of successful real-world collaborations with industry. For details, see the section “Industrial Minisymposia”.

The Local Scientific Program Committee will referee all submitted abstracts of presentations. Accepted presentations will be grouped into two-hour sessions based on their subjects.

Important Notices

  1. Limitation of the number of talks by each participant: Each participant is limited to presenting at most one talk during the congress (ICIAM 2023), including talks in minisymposia. This is in order to provide the opportunity for everyone to present their research. Note that talks in industrial minisymposia and industrial contributed talks as well as invited talks are excluded from this limitation.
  2. Conference format: In principle, ICIAM 2023 will be held in a hybrid conference format. If the situation demands, we will switch the conference format to an online format. Even if that is the case, ICIAM 2023 will not reimburse any expense including travel expenses and hotel charges of participants.
  3. Registration fee refunds: See “Cancellation and Refund Policy”.

Important Dates

All deadlines are at midnight AoE (Anywhere on Earth).

  • Submissions open on: April 15, 2022
  • Closing date for submissions: December 23, 2022
  • Notification of decisions: within two months after submission of each proposal
  • Registration fees for speakers are due on July 20, 2023 (speakers who have not registered by that date will have their talks removed from the program.)

Industrial Contributed Talks

As mentioned above, an “industrial contributed talk” is a form of a contributed talk. The term ‘industry’ is used in a broad sense to denote all kinds of business and commercial firms with economic activity and non-profit R&D organizations with activities outside the realm of education and academic research (including financial institutions, public administrations, and hospitals).

Industrial contributed talks will be structured in accordance with “Economic Activities of Industrial or Business Interest” and “Societal Challenges”. In addition, the proposals should focus on one (and only one) of the following Industrial Mathematics Aspects (IMA):

  • IMA-1. Success stories developed under memorandum of understanding, contract, or competitive projects with industrial support.
  • IMA-2. Case studies including initiatives such as study groups with industry, Modelling Weeks, Industry Days, master thesis, PhD thesis, etc.
  • IMA-3. Education.
  • IMA-4. Worldwide infrastructures to promote collaborations between industry and academia.
  • IMA-5. Other

Economic Activities of Industrial or Business Interest

  • EA-1. Agriculture and Fishing
  • EA-2. Biomedicine and Health Care
  • EA-3. Construction
  • EA-4. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Industry
  • EA-5. Economy and Finance
  • EA-6. Electronics
  • EA-7. Energy and Environment
  • EA-8. Food
  • EA-9. Information and Communication Technology
  • EA-10. Logistics and Transport
  • EA-11. Materials
  • EA-12. Mechanics and Mechatronics
  • EA-13. Public Administration and Defense
  • EA-14. Service Management
  • EA-15. Textiles, Clothing and Footwear
  • EA-16. Other

Societal Challenges

  • SC-1. Health, demographic change and wellbeing
  • SC-2. Food security, sustainable agriculture and forestry, marine and maritime and inland water research, and the Bioeconomy
  • SC-3. Secure, clean and efficient energy
  • SC-4. Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials
  • SC-5. A changing world ‐ inclusive, innovative and reflective societies
  • SC-6. Secure societies – protecting freedom and security
  • SC-7. Other

Call for Embedded Meeting

The organizers of the ICIAM 2023 Tokyo Congress are pleased to launch the call for proposals of embedded meetings. Embedded meetings are those held during the week of the ICIAM Congress and which share resources with the main ICIAM Congress. Participants of an embedded meeting are required to register as ICIAM 2023 participants, and the program of an embedded meeting will be organized as an ICIAM 2023 session.

If you are interested in organizing an embedded meeting, please contact Prof. Takeshi Ogita, Chair of the Satellite & Embedded Meetings Committee, at meetings-committee@iciam2023.org. Please include a brief description of the event, including the following information:

  • The scope and content of the meeting
  • Chairperson of the Local Organizing Committee (who will work in liaison with the organizers of the proposed embedded meeting and the organizers of ICIAM 2023)
  • The estimated number of participants
  • The estimated number of speakers
  • The URL of the web page of the proposed meeting (if available)

Feel free to contact us with tentative information for meetings that are not yet fully planned. This information will be useful to others planning related meetings. A notification of acceptance/rejection will be sent to the contributors within two months after submission.

  • Submissions open on: August 26, 2021
  • Closing date for submissions: November 1, 2022
  • Notification of decision: within two months after submission

Call for Satellite Meeting

The organizers of the ICIAM 2023 Tokyo Congress are pleased to launch the call for proposals of satellite meetings. Satellite meetings are those held within a few weeks of ICIAM 2023 on a topic of interest to ICIAM attendees in a location that makes it convenient for ICIAM participants to combine events into a single trip. Satellite meetings have no official connection to ICIAM beyond a cross listing on the ICIAM 2023 webpage.

Satellite meetings are to be organized and run by independent organizations or groups, and accepted proposals will be registered as ICIAM Satellite meetings. The organizers of the satellite event shall mention in the web page of the meeting that it is a registered satellite meeting. However ICIAM does not provide any financial or other support for satellite meetings.

If you are interested in organizing a satellite meeting, please contact Prof. Takeshi Ogita, Chair of the Satellite & Embedded Meetings Committee, at meetings-committee@iciam2023.org. Please include a brief description of the event, including the following information:

  • The full name (including any abbreviations) of the proposed meeting
  • The scope and content of the meeting
  • Chairperson of the Local Organizing Committee (who will work in liaison with the organizers of the proposed satellite meeting and the organizers of ICIAM 2023)
  • The estimated number of participants
  • Venue and Dates
  • The URL of the web page of the proposed satellite meeting (if available)

Feel free to contact us with tentative information for meetings that are not yet fully planned. This information will be useful to others planning related meetings. A notification of acceptance/rejection will be sent to the contributors within one month after submission.

  • Submissions open on: August 26, 2021
  • Closing date for submissions: November 1, 2022
  • Notification of decision: within one months after submission

Submission System

Proposals for ICIAM 2023 minisymposia and contributed talks can be submitted via the link below.

ICIAM 2023 Submission System : Here

  • Minisymposium : Proposal of Minisymposium
  • Minisymposium : Submission of a Talk in Minisymposium
  • Contributed Talk : Submission of a Contributed Talk

Local Information

Host City, Tokyo

Tokyo is one of the world’s largest cities offering visitors a uniquely eclectic mix of traditional and contemporary attractions. The city has something for everyone. Its cleanliness and safety are well-known and it is full of attractions, historic and modern. During every visit to the city, there is a new and exciting discovery. From the famous cat café to ancient shrines, to designer shops and traditional restaurants, there are numerous places to visit and enjoy.

Many research laboratories of various companies are located in Tokyo. For instance, Hitachi Research & Development Group has the Global Center for Social Innovation – Tokyo, and its Collaborative Creation Space. The Toshiba Science Museum is also located in the Greater Tokyo area. ICIAM participants will have the opportunity to visit them and discuss mathematical topics with researchers in industry.

A metropolis full of attractions like no other

Tokyo is known as one of Asia’s most modern cities, but traditions and cultures passed down from the Samurai period can still be seen and experienced. The city is a fast-paced cultural hub where what’s new and modern sits alongside historical gems. Tokyo offers visitors a uniquely eclectic mix of traditional and contemporary attractions, including world-renowned, exceptional Japanese cuisine.

Delicious, delicate, and diverse cuisines


Tokyo is without doubt one of the world’s gourmet paradises. Guests will be overwhelmed by the sheer range of choices for dining, with 100,000 restaurants offering tempting delights from around the world. In addition, you can experience the finest restaurants and highest culinary standards in the world. Of course, there is no better place in the world to enjoy sushi, tempura, sukiyaki and other traditional delicacies, and to experience authentic Japanese flavors.

Shopping


There are countless opportunities for visitors to shop for the beautiful and innovative products for which
Japan is world-famous: exquisite green teas and traditional sweets, attractive lacquerware and textiles
as well as fashion, from the classic to the avant-garde, in addition to state-of-the-art electronics products. Crossing through the Ginza shopping district, home to the biggest brand-name stores, the oldest department store in the world, and the Sony building, leads to Akihabara’s “Electric Town”, where multi-storied mega-stores and backstreet specialist shops deal in the latest electronics and coolest pop-culture
trends.

Tokyo at night


As dusk falls, Tokyo is transformed into a city of bright lights. Many observation decks in towers
and tall buildings are open till late, providing great vantage points for lovely night views. An
evening stroll through the streets of Shinjuku, Ginza or Shibuya – Tokyo’s best-known
nightlife districts – is a great way to see the city after dusk and enjoy the myriad of neon lights.
Visitors who want to “act like the locals” can enjoy the izakaya (local pubs) for a Japanese beer and yakitori (grilled chicken on a skewer) or visit a karaoke lounge for their own private sing-athon party. Guaranteed fun stories for the folks back home!

Arts & culture, traditional themes


Tokyo has dozens of museums spanning nearly every topic and interest with many offering glimpses into Japan’s rich and diverse history. For the more contemporary minded, there is an impressive number of smaller museums and galleries showcasing home-grown artists. Ueno Park is the most famous spot with various museums gathered in one area and we recommend visiting there if you are interested in arts and culture.

If you want to know more about Japanese traditional culture such as Kabuki, Noh and Sumo, there are various
places in Tokyo where you can encounter them.

Overall Affordability

Tokyo offers quality goods and services suited for all budgets, and participants are sure to find good value for money. Although Tokyo used to be recognized as one of the most expensive cities in the world, prices are no longer high compared with other big cities. The Starbucks index shows that a Starbucks latte in Japan costs less than in other global mega cities such as Paris, Sydney, Beijing and Seoul.

Subway fare

A single Tokyo Metro fare of less than USD 3 will get you to most destinations within central Tokyo. The city’s subway and railway services are among the best in the world; they are not only inexpensive but also frequent, reliable and clean, and have multilingual signs.

Meals

To satisfy the demanding taste buds of locals and international visitors, restaurants, cafes and bars strive to serve quality food and drinks at affordable prices.

Publicity

Congress Logo

ICIAM 2023 Logo

ICIAM 2023 Logo [Square Version]

Cancellation and Refund Policy

  • Delegates may receive a refund less 25% processing fee for cancellation requests made by April 20, 2023.
  • Cancellations from April 21 to July 20, 2023 will be subject to a 50% processing fee.
  • No refunds will be granted for cancellation after July 21, 2023.
  • If you have to cancel your participation and would like to be refunded, please send by e-mail a written request to contact@iciam2023.org by July 20, 2023.
  • Refunds will be issued after the Conference. Bank charges will be deducted from the refund.
  • ICIAM 2023 will not be responsible for any losses incurred by attendees, including (but not limited to) airline cancellation charges or hotel deposits.

Hotels/Tours/Flights

Accommodation

Tokyo offers more than 96,000 rooms ranging from budget hotels to five-star luxury hotels, assuring friendly, high-quality service for guests. There are more than 6,000 rooms within 30 minutes by local transportation and/or walking distance to the venue.

Tours

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government will offer the following complimentary tours and cultural programs for overseas guests of ICIAM 2023. These tours will take them to the main tourist sites in Tokyo during the Congress, and cultural programs will offer outstanding exotic experiences.

Tokyo City Tour – Half-day Tour

Japanese Garden & River Cruise


This tour will take visitors to traditional Japanese gardens, such as the Hama-Rikyu Gardens, a typical garden of the Edo period (1603–1868), or the Imperial Palace East Gardens, a part of the palace grounds open to the public, and the former site of Edo Castle. A river cruise from the Hama-Rikyu Gardens will offer views of Tokyo from the river.

Asakusa – Japan’s Most Famous Temple


The tour will take you to Asakusa, which is the old center of downtown Tokyo, and the most famous sightseeing spot in Tokyo. The area maintains the atmosphere of the old capital, with its 200m-long covered avenue of numerous stalls leading up to Japan’s most famous Buddhist temple, Sensoji. You can find traditional shops to buy souvenirs or Japanese local sweets and fast food along the market street.

One-day trip from Tokyo


Mt. Takao – The western fringes of Tokyo Travel beyond the western suburbs of Tokyo to a place where you can feel the Japanese spiritual world coexisting with nature. Mt. Takao is both a popular hiking spot and a religious destination. It takes approximately 90 minutes from the venue to Mt. Takao, where you can enjoy clean, fresh air in a natural environment. You can also experience Goma Kito, a ritual fire performance by a priest. Shojin ryori, Buddhist vegetarian cuisine, is included for lunch in the tour.

Cultural Programs

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government will offer the following complimentary cultural programs for delegates and accompanying persons to experience first-hand the unique culture of Japan.

Origami-Paper Miracle


Origami, literally meaning “folding paper”, is a traditional Japanese art of transforming a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture. You can create almost anything with origami, from a simple airplane to flowers and animals. The most popular origami is a Japanese crane.

Cha No Yu – Japanese Tea Ceremony


Cha-no-yu is not just about the ceremonial way of serving tea; it is an art form that also concentrates on the relationship between the host and the guest. In the search for the ultimate hospitality, each encounter is treasured as a once-in-a-lifetime event. Guests can experience the beauty and elegance of cha-no-yu.

Dress in Kimono – Japanese Traditional Clothing


Kimono is a Japanese traditional clothing made with fabrics frequently hand-made and decorated. Kimono was worn in daily life in Japan in olden times, and is still worn on special occasions such as weddings and tea ceremonies. Guests can try out Kimono and enjoy taking photos.

Flights

Tokyo, great access from all over the world

Tokyo provides great direct air access for overseas travelers and is served by two international airports: Narita International Airport and Tokyo International Airport (Haneda). Narita offers over 1,400 international flights per week from 107 cities around the world, while Haneda offers over 600 international flights per week from 30 major cities.

Narita International Airport

  • 2nd largest and busiest airport in Japan, serving 35 million passengers a year
  • Connected with 107 cities worldwide
  • 88 international airlines serve the Airport

Haneda International Airport

  • Largest number of flight arrivals/departures in Japan
  • Located near the city center, 15 minutes to Tokyo Station
  • Over 600 international arrivals per week
  • Connected with 28 cities around the world with plans for increase
  • 33 international airlines serve the Airport

Arrival at the airport

Narita International Airport is about 60 km from central Tokyo, and is easily accessed by either the Narita Express in 60 minutes or the new Skyliner Access Express in 40 minutes. Haneda International Airport is even more convenient, located within 15 km (15 minutes by train) of central Tokyo. Within the city, a well-developed network of public transportation allows easy and convenient movement in and around the city. Major modes of transportation include trains, subways, buses and taxis.

Waseda University is located near the Shinjuku area in the heart of Tokyo. All delegates can easily travel to the venue, it takes 30–40 minutes from Haneda Airport to Shinjuku area by the Airport Limousine shuttle bus.

Access within Tokyo

An extensive network of trains and subways runs through central Tokyo, offering convenient and easy commuting. The unique numbering system of the Tokyo Metro, which identifies the metro lines as well as each station, makes it easy even for first-timers to know which lines to get on and off. In addition, the safety and cleanliness of the trains and subway cars means that travelers have no hesitation about making full use of the transportation system, even at night. Taxis run widely in Tokyo, and can be stopped on the street curb as well as at taxi stands in front of hotels, train stations and large buildings. Taxis are clean and comfortable, offering white-glove service.

A network of train lines operated by JR East Japan and the subway lines of Tokyo Metro and Toei link stations around Tokyo. Symbols and signs at the stations are multilingual in English, Korean and Chinese. Train timetables are located on the platforms and trains move very punctually.

Tokyo Railway & Subway Route Map

Committees

Scientific Program Committee

Chair

  • Yasumasa Nishiura, Tohoku University, Japan

Members

  • Martine Labbe, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
  • Helena Judith Nussenzveig Lopes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Alejandro Jofre, Universidad de Chile, Chile
  • Tao Tang, Southern University of Science and Technology, China
  • Xiaoshan Gao, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, China
  • Gabriel Peyré, CNRS, France
  • Sylvie Méléard, Ecole polytechnique, France
  • Barbara Wohlmuth, TU München, Germany
  • Alex Martin, Univ Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
  • Dirk Hartmann, Siemens, Princeton, Germany
  • Roberto Natalini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy
  • Hiroshi Kokubu, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Martin Wechselberger, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Jin Keun Seo, Yonsei University, South Korea
  • Carlos María Parés Madroñal, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
  • Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, DAMTP, Cambridge, UK
  • Des Higham, The University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Cynthia A. Phillips, Sandia National Laboratories, USA
  • Wolfgang Dahmen, University of South Carolina, USA
  • Karen Wilcox, UT Austin, USA
  • Katya Scheinberg, Cornell Univ, USA

Organizing Committee

  • Shin’ichi Oishi, Waseda University, Japan, Congress Director
  • Hisashi Okamoto, Gakushuin University, Japan, Deputy Congress Director
  • Hiroshi Akiba, The University of Tokyo / Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan
  • Keiko Imai, Chuo University, Japan
  • Kenji Kajiwara, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Hiroshi Kokubu, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Motoko Kotani, Tohoku University, Japan
  • Kenichi Maruno, Waseda University, Japan
  • Osamu Saeki, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Kazue Sako, Waseda University, Japan
  • Katsuyuki Takashima, Waseda University, Japan
  • Shao-Liang Zhang, Nagoya University, Japan

Executive Committee

  • Shin’ichi Oishi, Waseda University, Japan, Chair
  • Hisashi Okamoto, Gakushuin University, Japan, Deputy Chair
  • Daisuke Furihata, Osaka University, Japan
  • Elliott Ginder, Meiji University, Japan, Secretary
  • Kenji Kajiwara, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Masaharu Nagayama, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Takeshi Ogita, Tokyo Women’s Christian University, Japan, Secretary
  • Katsuhisa Ozaki, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan, Secretary
  • Takashi Sakajo, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Kouta Sekine, Chiba Institute of Technology, Japan, Secretary
  • Hiroshi Suito, Tohoku University, Japan
  • Naoya Yamanaka, Meisei University, Japan, Secretary

Local Scientific Program Committee

Chair

  • Takeshi Ogita, Tokyo Women’s Christian University, Japan

Members

Organizers/Sponsors

ICIAM

The International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM) is a world-wide organization for professional applied mathematics societies, and for other societies with a significant interest in industrial or applied mathematics. The International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, held every four years, is the flagship conference of ICIAM.

Organizers

JSIAM


JSIAM, the Japan Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, was established in April 1990, and is the central organization for industrial and applied mathematicians in Japan. It currently has approximately 1300 individual members and 23 corporate members including Toyota, Nissan, Hitachi, NEC, and Canon. The JSIAM’s objective is to foster the mathematical sciences and engineering mathematics which contribute to the innovation of science and technology. It is a cross-disciplinary society consisting of people researching mathematical phenomena (in mathematics as well as in other sciences), those who apply mathematics (engineering, technology), and those who develop methods of analysis (computer science, experimental science).

Both the JSIAM and the MSJ are registered members of the Science Council of Japan, which is the governmental body administering the promotion and enhancement of sciences in Japan. Members of both societies have actively attended past ICIAM congresses since their inception, with recent ICIAMs attracting around 100 participants from Japan. Furthermore, both societies have sent representatives to every ICIAM Board Meeting.

MSJ

MSJ, The Mathematical Society of Japan, founded in 1877, is one of the oldest academic societies in Japan. Currently, the MSJ has more than 5,000 individual and institutional members. It organized the International Congress of Mathematicians in Kyoto in 1990 with great success. The MSJ conducts various activities to support mathematical research and education, thereby contributing to science and culture in general. It holds two annual meetings and organizes workshops/seminars, such as the Takagi Lectures and the MSJ-Seasonal Institutes. The MSJ’s activities include: (1) publishing journals, conference proceedings and books, (2) commending, through various awards, mathematicians who have made significant achievements in pure and applied mathematics, and (3) holding public lectures and seminars for a general audiences. As a body of professionals with mathematical expertise, the MSJ has been making policy proposals to the Japanese Government in order to improve the national education and research environment of mathematical sciences. The MSJ is also committed to a global agenda through its international activities. For example, members of the MSJ actively participate in international conferences such as the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) and the Asian Mathematical Conference (AMC). Furthermore, Dr. Shigefumi Mori, a member of the MSJ, was elected as president of the International Mathematical Union (IMU), the first ever from Asia.

Sponsors

Waseda University

Waseda University is one of the largest research universities in Japan. It employs more than 2,000 permanent faculty members and has a student body of more than 45,000 undergraduates and 8,000 graduate students. Founded in 1882 by the former prime minister of Japan, Shigenobu Okuma, it is also one of the oldest universities in Japan. Waseda University has hosted various international congresses on the scale of many thousands of participants on information technology, electronics, physics, etc. All lecture halls, seminar rooms, and the Okuma Auditorium are air-conditioned. Waseda University has generously offered these fabulous facilities for ICIAM 2023 without a fee.

Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau

Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau (TCVB) is the official destination marketing and management organization for Tokyo. Its goal is to build economic prosperity and support community development through tourism. It effectively market the city and communicate the ever-evolving image of Tokyo to global audiences in the aim of attracting visitors and business events. This is achieved through the coordinated group efforts of community, partners, and staff working together.